The BEST CLASSICS YOU Have TO READ (or re-read) THIS SUMMER

I have always LOVED reading. I can remember being about 8 years old and hooked on the Potter books before physically moving into the world of Robert Muchamore’s spy academy. Seriously, my childhood was either spent in Hogwarts or being a CHERUB – you could not get me out. As I moved into my teen years, of course I was into young fiction. Looking back, I think that’s where I got most of my ideas about love and fantasy. As I got older though I became more fascinated in classics – particularly in contemporary dystopian novels where I’m transported into a world of misfortune and sadness. Anyway, I digress. Here is my list of my top 5 novels (new and old) that you have to read.

  1. The Body – Bill Bryson

Last year, the American author Bill Bryson came out with his latest non-fiction novel. As someone who rarely reads non-fiction books, I was blown away by the style of Bryson’s writing and how it was able to keep me engaged. It’s a good read for those who are curious about every aspect of the body. Bryson keeps you on your toes from the moment you open the book to the last page; with facts about the heart, face, brain and every bodily system you can think of. I would highly recommend this book, and to be frank, its the book that started my non-fiction journey.

2. Station 11 – Emily St John Mandel

This book was actually recommended to me at a book club I attended two years ago. It’s about a virus that takes over the world in less than 24 hours (uncanny), killing everyone it infects within a matter of hours. The story follows several characters along their lives 20 years after the virus hit. The themes and storylines that are brought up in this book haunted me for for at least a year. St John Mandel’s writing is amazing and this book was an absolute page turner. I mean, it was such a good book, that I had to write a 20 page essay on its characters and themes, definitely worth the read.

3. 1984 – George Orwell

My battered copy of Orwell’s 1984 has been passed down from my great uncle to my dad and then to me. I read it first when I was 10 and revisited the book a few years later. Only then did I realise how many important points I had missed. If you don’t know the book already; it follows the protagonist Winston Smith who represents the feelings of every human being in a twisted, dark world. Orwell writes with so much subtext, warning the world of what there will be to come.

4. The Handmaid’s tale – Margaret Atwood

Again, I have to add this dystopian classic. It was actually released a few years the hit 1984. Atwood found it so eye-opening that she decided to write her own and in my opinion, she did it better. Not only does she create an entire world where the world goes to shit and people have to deal with it, Atwood created a masterpiece that will hold relevancy not only today but for hundreds and thousands of years to come – that’s where the beauty lies. The sequel to ‘A Handmaid’s tale’ is ‘The Testaments’ which talks about the the fall of Gilead.

‘History doesn’t repeat itself, but it often rhymes’

Mark TWAIN

5. When breath becomes air – Paul Kalanithi

I remember reading this book on the train from London to Brighton. The first three-quarters or so of the book was written by the award-winning late Dr Kalanithi, who wrote about his time as a neurosurgeon. The book was finished by his wife after he sadly passed away from lung cancer in 2015. It’s heartbreaking but beautifully written, the majority of the time I was laughing through the tears – it’s a good read.

The BEST CLASSICS YOU Have TO READ (or re-read) THIS SUMMER

I have always LOVED reading. I can remember being about 8 years old and hooked on the Potter books before physically moving into the world of Robert Muchamore’s spy academy. Seriously, my childhood was either spent in Hogwarts or being a CHERUB – you could not get me out. As I moved into my teen […]

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DAY TRIPS AFTER LOCKDOWN

When the lockdown restrictions were lifted, my family and I were at great difficulty when picking a place to visit for a day trip. You see, for the last 12 weeks we had been reminiscing our old trips and optimistically researching and planning new ones for the near future. We had so many places on […]

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reminiscing düsseldorf

The current travel restrictions put in place due to the pandemic means that most of us have been stuck at home and can only flick through holiday albums and fantasise about about the trips we were due to take this year. For me, it’s Düsseldorf. The prominent German city which sits east of the Rhine […]

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reminiscing düsseldorf

The current travel restrictions put in place due to the pandemic means that most of us have been stuck at home and can only flick through holiday albums and fantasise about about the trips we were due to take this year.

For me, it’s Düsseldorf. The prominent German city which sits east of the Rhine river and hosts an array of luxury brands and museums. I’ve visited Düsseldorf multiple times over the past 5 years, but no visit was more special to me than my most recent trip there. It was during the beginning of the Christmas period and the lights in the town square had just been switched on. My previous visits to the city took place during the summer months, hence why this trip was the start of a new experience for me.

There’s nothing better than visiting a typical German Christmas market in the months of November. Although Düsseldorf remains one of the wealthiest and most expensive cities in Germany, the Christmas markets are far cheaper and more value for money than the ones near my home in London. Whether you prefer to splurge on Bratwurst hotdogs, chips and gravy – the national favourite – or browse the stalls with individually handcrafted nutcrackers and tree decorations, then the Christmas markets are just for you.

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It wasn’t only the Christmas markets which made my holiday. It was also the weather. I’ve always loved the winter season. It includes the combination of my favourite holidays (Halloween, Christmas, Birthdays…) but also the satisfaction of wrapping up in my winter coat, wearing thick walking socks and boots, longing for snowfall and only cringing at the approach of warmer seasons. Düsseldorf was cold but magical. From the minute I stepped off the plane, I felt a harsh wind pinching at every inch of my face. The best way to make the most of the weather was to take a stroll down the river in Königsallee. You will see a multitude of picturesque bridges and streams of small canal boats docked up for the winter. Beware though, Königsallee is also the ultimate shopping destination, boasting high end brands such as Gucci, Louis Vuitton and Rolex. This entire street would be filled with lights and Christmas decor so you are bound to bump into overly excited tourists one way or another. I hope to return to Düsseldorf soon – preferably again during the winter and perhaps explore more of the Christmas markets.

If you would like to see more of my trip to Germany, check out my video here.

If you liked this post, check out my other travel articles; Top 10 highlights in Amsterdam and 48 hours in Prague.

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PAINTING TIPS FOR DUMMIES…

from a dummy.

I have zero artistic talent. None, whatsoever. Back at school, my friends would spend hours during art lessons, focusing all their attention on the centre piece. They would squint to focus on the image every time they looked up and they drew with intricate wrist movements, using a variety of tools to imitate the look of the object in the centre of the room. I, on the other hand, would finish in no more than 10 minutes. I would hand in my work to the teacher, who would only just sigh, knowing that the weeks of training me to have the slightest bit of artistic flare had gone down the drain.

Its been many years since then and although my patience for drawing has not changed, I have learned to appreciate the skill and dedication needed to fill a blank canvas. I have also found a new love for geometric drawings and painting block colours. Long gone are the days where I tried to draw streams, forests or skeletons in the centre of art classroom.

I started drawing one line pictures and used blocks of colour to create repetitive patterns. At this point, my godfather (an excellent painter) gifted me some acrylic paint. I immediately YouTubed ‘easy painting tutorials’ and came across one that easy enough for me to try.

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I used a mix of poster and acrylic paint. The reason for this is because poster paint can easily be manipulated due to its soluble nature and acrylic is not water soluble. The advantage of acrylic paint is that it gives the painting a softer finish. Mixing both paints allowed me to create new colours without waste and have a cleaner finish. The brand of poster paint I used was Giotto. It’s amazing; inexpensive and comes in an array of beautiful colours.  

First, I dabbed my paintbrush in orange and topped it off with some white. It was important not to mix the colours as that would have given me a light orange. Instead, I wanted a strong orange tone with white streaks. I painted on a landscape piece of card, starting in the middle of the page and working my way down. 

Next I moved to the top of the page. I painted the entire top half white before adding a bright pink to it. With the pink, I worked my way downwards until it met the orange. At this point, I continued to mix a blend of pinks, whites and oranges until it looked as though both colours ran seamlessly through each other. 

Next, it was time to tackle the mountains. I started by drawing some blue lines 3/4 of the way down the page. I started filling some of the colour, but it wasn’t necessary to complete the entire painting since I was going to add more colours. The point of this was to create a shadowing effect, as if the sun had just slowing started rising.

I repeated the mountain effect 3 more times, using a darker colour each time until the final colour used was black. To create more of a mountain range effect I made sure to layer them over each other. Over the third layer (greyish – black), I decided to dab my paintbrush over the wet paint to add some texture in the painting. Once the entire sheet had dried, I painted a golden circle. After all, what would a sunrise be without the sun?



Now, might I warn you that just because I’m giving a painting tutorial doesn’t NOT mean I’m any good. I purely paint as a form of therapy and relaxation. If you would like to see the actual tutorial, it can be found here.

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New editions

We’ve all said ‘new year, new me’ at every orbit the EARTH has made around the sun, even so, this phrase seems much easier said than done. Humans tend to over-celebrate the birth of a new year through excessive partying and celebration, yet struggle to realise that the new year is a celebration of the Earth- not you.

Yes, we can use this opportunity to turn over a new leaf; become better editions of ourselves. However, it’s the way in which we do it that matters the most.

“Time is relative, and flexible, the dividing line between past, present, and future is an illusion”

Time is merely just a social construct invented by the Egyptians to create order. We constantly live around deadlines such as submitting in work or even to catch the bus. In all honesty, these deadlines only exist to run a decently functioning world where disorder is prevented. We even set our own personal goals under deadlines which, when we don’t meet, gives an overwhelming feeling of failure. Following your life around deadlines can make your head burrow deep underground, often causing rushed work. This may make you miss out on opportunities and open paths to help you with your journey. Instead, we could create different versions of ourselves and learn from previous mistakes. Even if you feel as if your goal is still further from reaching distance after creating different versions of yourself, an open head and an open mind will allow you to venture into new realms and create better ideas.

Whatever time zone you may live in (on Earth), as individuals we should learn to live in our own time, working on individual goals at our own paces. Of course, at times there will be moments when we compare/get compared to people similar to us who have publicly achieved something. This should not hold you back. In fact, with hard work and determination, you could have anything you wanted and even more. With every mistake you make, a wiser version of yourself is created. Let’s not wait until a new year to turn over a new leaf. Take each day as it comes and every mistake as a learning curve. Add every achieved goal on to your timeline and soon you’ll flourish in success. Have a productive year!

Rush Hour Crush

I got caught in the midst of rush hour on Thursday. The worst time of the day when you’re in London; crowded trains filled with business people or tourists. Everyone receives a fair amount of pushes, shoves and the occasional elbow to the rib. All in all, we just want to get home.

Somehow I got onto the tube in one piece. Holding a large shopping bag, wearing my backpack over my thick winter jacket and headphones in, a must, whilst listening to heavy metal to drown out the noises of crying babies and enthusiastic tourists. There I was, looking like a right sort. I was tapping my fingers on the pole to the beat of the music when I saw him. I must have been loud because he saw me tapping and smiled. He was standing about an arm’s length in front. But of course, having been rush hour meant that there were at least 3 people inbetween us – like the wall of Verona separating Romeo and Juliet.

He wore a charcoal grey suit jacket and an unbuttoned baby pink shirt. No tie – which I don’t blame because of the humidity. I couldn’t see his shoes but I presumed they were somewhat smart. He had an olive skin tone but it was his hair that had struck me the most. Locks of brown glossy hair, curly and remained at the scalp yet dead straight on the edges.

He got a seat after a herd of people got off at the train at Turnpike Lane, leaving me still standing. I thought it’d be a good idea to bluetooth him a picture of what I was listening to since he had cared enough to smile. He didn’t appear on the Airdrop list. To my unfortune, nothing came up with his image and instead I accidently sent the image to ‘Danielle’s iphone’ – boy I bet she was confused. A few stops went by and the seat next to him became available. A message from the heavens. This was my chance. I sat beside him and took off my headphones and adjusted my hair using the help of my reflection in the window opposite. He smelled strongly of a freshly applied JPG – a smell which was fairly familiar to me.

The remainder of the journey was a quiet one. We both left the train at the same stop via a different set of double doors. He smiled again when I turned to look around for him. Is he just polite or playing with my feelings?

The train jolted to a stop. I ran out through the doors and up the escalators to catch my next bus in time. This was it. Time for the love of my life to run up behind me and ask for my number so we could stay up all night and talk on the phone. Tonight was the premiered night of many that we’d spend together and live to have a life of four children and live in a country home and own the biggest farm. Tonight –

“Excuse me?”

I stop. Eyes wide open in shock. Heart pounding against my chest. Legs turn to jelly. My prayers just keep on getting answered today. The angels are by my side.

That’s when my farce o’clock struck. I turned around to find it wasn’t him. It wasn’t him at all. I knew who this person was though. He sat diagonal to me on the train I had just been on. Gym bag, jogging bottoms, baggy t-shirt, expensive trainers and wearing AirPods. He was probably one of those exercise people – oh no – a personal trainer. He’s not going to ask if I needed any help did he?

“Yes?”

“Would you mind if I had your phone number?”

I politely declined and walked away, still searching for my twilight tube man. He was gone and so was my bus ride home.

Barbie’s problem

A few weeks ago when I was teaching a girl no less than 10, I saw that her pencil case was covered with prints and stickers of Disney princesses. This for me brought back moments to reminisce. I picked up the case and fingered the outlines of it. How I used to look up to all these characters, creating shrines for them in my bedroom and dressing up like them for every birthday. Momentarily, I asked the girl who her favourite was. “Belle” she said. Then I asked her least favourite expecting a villain like Scar or Ursula. “Tatiana”, she said as if it were obvious enough. I asked why. Her response instantly brought me back from my reminiscent high. “Because she’s brown.”

“Brown, but you’re brown too?”. Bearing in mind that the girl, like myself originates from South Asia. “I’m not brown, I’m white” she said almost proudly. I ended the conversation right there. The last thing I wanted was to argue with a child. Her comment angered me but more importantly I was concerned to what made her think this way. What was so wrong with us Asians that made her want to deny the fact that she was brown?

This isn’t the first time that problems have arisen with diversity in fictional characters and toys for children. Take Barbie for example; the doll was first released in 1959 where is wasn’t really a problem for all dolls being identical in skin colour, hair or having the “perfect” body. It was a huge hit with young children and parents since birthday presents had just gotten easier.

The issue relies on the fact that young girls from across the globe will have been conditioned to think that beauty only lies within a woman of white skin, blonde hair and a body shape that is impossible and unhealthy to achieve. Studies show that 40% of children are dissatisfied with the way they look after having received a Barbie doll. This comes from a variety of reasons such as body image and skin colour. Although the demographic for the Barbie is well below the age of ten, the long term consequences are much more severe. Having worries about body image at a young age is more likely to lead to having disorders with eating, social anxiety and body dysmorphia. What Mattel failed to mention is that the real life size of Barbie is frankly impossible to achieve. According to calculations, the doll would have a dress size of 2, this being far below the average dress size of an adult and extremely unhealthy.

It took almost 60 years for Barbie to have a transformation. In 2016 Mattel created dolls with several skin tones and body shapes. One size certainly does not fit all and customers were given a choice of what kind of Barbie they could have. But was it 60 years too late? Barbie’s brand image will always be of a silicon plastic doll with white skin and blonde hair and not the diversity that has recently been introduced. So for the future, children will need to be brought up with the varied dolls, potentially reducing eating disorders in teenagers and a less conditioned vision of beauty.

Barbie body image

Crowd surfer. By Tallulah Stone

Crowd surfer. Me, on a swarm.

Surfing the crowd to search for you, my love. My love?

You look the same. A duplicate. Fourty hundred people. All the same as you. Peach in tone from intoxicant, eating you from the inside through out, bubbling away a new corpuscle.

Hands prodding on my back. Backwards, forwards. Forwards and backwards. Fingers stabbing into my back. Any pain will do, to get to you. My love.

     You look the same as them. Bandana, Bindi, Booze. But different, droned my conscience.

I spot you. Far away. Staring. Stinging.

I spot you. Whiskers, sculpted, hair of blondey auburn. Bern. You’re holding something, Rhine. I told you, same as everyone else. But different. Too good for me.

You see my umbrage from the prodding hands yet you stare. Staring at my beauty or gratifying at my discomfort? I can never tell. That’s why you’re different. Too good for me.

But when I’m released from the prodding hands, you’re gone. Right, Left, Up, Down. Nowhere to be seen.

Gone, but you’ve left something behind. An electrifying sting. I want more.

Unconventional methods of dating

Online dating is not a brand new concept; In fact, it’s been around for almost three decades. Although the discovery of new technology allowed websites such as match.com develop into applications on our mobile phones, the objective of matching with a stranger online and having a potential relationship with them has remained the same. Popular dating apps include Eharmony, Zoosk, Tinder and the budding Bumble. Having previously tried Tinder before, I was keen to use Bumble as I had not really heard of it before and intrigued to find out what was in store.

As ironic as it may sound now, I wasn’t actively looking for a relationship. I strongly believe these things should never be forced and so, without much anticipation or expectation, I opened up the app.

Initial thoughts: I particularly liked the colour scheme; a strong golden yellow, which was attractive to the eye and useful for making your profile radiant. The concept being to find the pollen to your queen bee, in other words, your soulmate/best friend. The app allows you to have up to six images of yourself, a short biography as well as connect your Instagram and Spotify. This is what my profile looked like: (excluding images)

When writing a biography, it’s best to include your passions and something that represents your personality. In my case, this was something quite comical (as I find myself to be quite the comedian). The profiles that didn’t particularly catch my attention and immediately made me swipe left (reject) were the ones that said something along the lines of “swipe right for a good time” or “life-guard, so actually certified to give you mouth to mouth”. Yes, this was a real one.. I mean, it’s good to be a little enigmatic but there is a fine line between mysterious and unpleasant. Additionally, the best profiles also had the most intriguing images. They were often filled with colour and showed a genuine personality. Selfies are mediocre but the bee wants the flower with the most character, so perhaps use pictures of you travelling or partaking in a hobby. 

Unlike other dating apps, an advantageous feature Bumble is that it only allows the female to start a conversation with their match. Having an app that is so female orientated creates a sense of safety and a has a non-traditional value in which the male does not make the first move. Another compelling feature is that there is a 24 hour time cap to begin a conversation with your match including an additional 24 hours in which your match can respond. This gives only 2 days to strike up a conversation with someone, differing to other dating sites where the match can be kept on hold and dragged out for several months. This urges you to make a move as fast as possible meaning more bees buzz faster! Although, if the female does not start a conversation with her match, then there is an option for the male to use a ‘daily extend’, where you can remain matched for an additional day.

In my experience, the best conversation starters go along the lines of “Hey, how you doing?” or simply asking about their day. This will allow your match to open up and get the conversation going. A simple “hello” will not give your match a lot of work with, neither will a cringey pick up line. I started nearly all my conversations with a “Hey, how you doing?” followed by something that intrigued me about their profile. Once I received a reply from my matches, I was able to see who really had a genuine interest in me. 

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This was the only person who responded to the likes and interests of my profile which definitely got my attention, and I was intrigued to know more about them.
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I was a little confused by this one… he loves reading but hasn’t finished a book yet? I didn’t think it would be necessary continuing this conversation.
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And of course some just weren’t as serious as others.
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This was funny and flirtatious, again drawing me closer for more conversation.

The best response were the ones to reciprocate my questions and ask more about me.  My passion for crime novels and English literature was shared with a complete stranger and we were able to connect on a deeper level and speak more personally about ourselves so I began to develop a genuine interest in this person. This was my Bumble boy .That being said, this is how you can ‘over’ do things:

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You will know once the foundations of a potential relationship has been set when you begin to connect on other social media platforms other than the app itself. You begin to have a mix of constant flirting as well deep, meaningful heart to heart conversations and sending each other pictures of what we’ve come across in our day. For example; myself and Bumble boy would send each other pictures of the books we’re reading or bargains we’ve found at the supermarket for a few weeks or so (Yes, this is what adulting feels like). Then came the conversation of meeting up. He was always reassuring me that he did not want to push anything or make me feel uncomfortable in any way. Even so, just like most people, I felt anxious about meeting a stranger from the internet. He would always say “The worst case scenario is that I’m 50 and I’m fat but we are meeting in a public gallery and I most definitely not kill you!” – bearing in mind we both love crime novels and always come up with ways to kill each other when we’re flirting (grim, but sexy). 

The thought of meeting someone from online may sound daunting, and there are correct ways to approach this. Do meet in a public space – you will never know the intentions of the person you are meeting and even if you think you know them, you can never be sure. Make your place of meeting easily accessible for the both of you. You don’t need to travel lengths to meet someone for the first time, why not meet in the middle? Always let a close friend or family member know where you are at all times and what you’re doing – prepare for the worst case scenario. My match and I decided to meet up at a gallery in London during the afternoon. It had many visitors but was also quiet enough so we could communicate with each other clearly. We went on a long walk through Hyde Park and I showed him my favourite spots in London (since he was new to the city). Don’t pressure yourself to make a move with your match, first let the conversation flow and learn to feel comfortable in each others’ presence. If it was not meant to be, you will know so always prepare to be disappointed at least in the slightest.

I have a humiliating history of not being asked out on a second date. To my surprise, Bumble boy messaged me after our meeting and told me he enjoyed my company and would like to meet again. Triumph! I mainly think this was because I went to our date with no expectations. I didn’t put any pressure on myself to look amazing or be funny like I would do on most other dates, I also didn’t have any expectations from him..

Turing’s Pardon.

Alan Turing was a code breaker who revolutionised artificial intelligent engineering during the second world war. There were only a small number of people who only knew of him and his work before Benedict Cumberbatch’s portrayal of him in the award winning film, ’The Imitation Game’. Turing was part of a team which set out to break the Enigma Code – a complex set of letters and numbers coded by German scientists which was used send secret messages to German U-boats in the battle of Atlantic during the second world war. U-boats would often disrupt the paths of containment ships which contained vital supplies for Great Britain. By breaking this code, Turing and his team were able to outsmart the U-boats which eventually led the allies to victory and pushed back the war by at least four years. 

In contrast to the victory, Turing’s unfortunate suicide was triggered at first by being found guilty of “gross indecency contrary to Section II of the Criminal Law Amendment Act of 1885” on three attempts. Punished with a choice of either imprisonment or chemical castration, Turing was left with no choice but to ingest chemicals to “cure” his homosexuality. The idea was that the castration technique would turn him into a heterosexual by reducing his hormone levels. Turing was found dead in June of 1954 after intentionally eating an apple filled with cyanide. 

Almost 60 years later, in 2013, Turing was given a royal pardon by the queen – this was essentially an apology for the way in which he was brutally treated. This, of course, was supported by many important persons on a global scale. However, it also raised questions and thoughts about the type of small minded society that most Britons lived in. Those in the LGBT+ community often lived by keeping their identity a secret- or like Turing, marry a person of the opposite sex in order to remain ‘normal’ to the rest of society. 

During the war, there were many countries in which being homosexual was criminalised. However, in Germany, the LGBT community were especially segregated and went under the most merciless treatment. Both Great Britain and Germany were damaging communities and punishing homosexuals at extreme measures even though both countries were fighting each other. If both parties believed most truly in the same causes then was the war even that necessary? Additionally, it is a known fact that the person on the throne will pass all the laws. The Queen herself was coronated in 1953, Turing died in 1954 and homosexuality was legalised in 1967. Discarding all the circumstances, would it have been possible the homosexuality bill to be passed earlier, preventing Turing’s death anyway? 

There are many questions still being asked in which getting hold of an answer will merely seem impossible. Although, Turing’s work saved the lives of hundred and thousands of people, it was his identity that let him down in the end and he could not go on to contribute more to science due the simple fact that his sexual preference was not accepted in society. Changing laws does not necessarily change opinions. Everyone living in a small minded society cannot suddenly become more open to new ideas due to a passing of a bill. Yet following authority figures in order to bypass commotion only shows conformity and fear. Turing ignored the stigma placed upon his sexuality and came out honest and clean despite opinions and laws- this being a method we should all adapt. 

Source : The Daily Beast. (2018). The Castration of Alan Turing, Britain’s Code-Breaking WWII Hero. [online] Available at: https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-castration-of-alan-turing-britains-code-breaking-wwii-hero [Accessed 16 Oct. 2018].

Different. By Tallulah Stone

Me: an imaginist, a vivid wanderer. You could say perhaps, a narcissist.

I’ve always found myself different from others. Of course we’re all different from each other; unique is the word. But the ones around me, as a collective, are all the same. Same as each other but different from me.

Take my family for example. A wonderful, wonderful group of people; kind, gentle, generous. The adjectives could go on.  But, they are all the same. Doctors, engineers, nurses, teachers, an architect even. Then there are my friends; future doctors, teachers, engineers. Academics they are. A collection of academics. A collection of academics. 

And me? Well I’m a literary aficionado. Academics are all important to run the world, needless to say. But who is there to change minds, to change the way we view each other and to stop the crises of modern day. 

Me. Because I was not destined to fall in with the same crowd of academics. I’m different. Gifted perhaps. Gifted not with the power of words but with a mind that thinks differently. Differently.

Don’t even get me started on success. They want it all. A large house with beautifully furnished interiors and an impressive garden. The fanciest cars, the most luxurious holidays. All this for what? A small click and the picture’s taken and uploaded to the internet. To show off to the world their materialistic success. That’s how they find comfort; through likes and comments from other avatars who are hidden away behind the screens as if they are hypnotised.

1 like = 1 follow.

How wasteful. 

Do they truly believe that sharing an article of extreme poverty will solve the problem? Will watching a documentary on plastics in the ocean suddenly remove all the waste on beaches. If only 1 view meant 1kg of waste removed. You may say that awareness is spread. I’m sure it does but what will one do with the knowledge. Take action or bury the guilt within the depths of their garden?

And me? My success would be when I’m fulfilled. Fulfilled when the world no longer hungry, no longer needs my help. When boys and girls can be noticed as equals. Why isn’t it already equal?

Why do those in foreign continents want to impersonate the west in both colour and lavish lifestyle but not realise that girls and boys belong together.  

The west must take blame for sure. The west that we live in. The west which believes that feminism should even be a word. Why isn’t there a word for male equality?

And to all those who say ‘the future is female.’ No, the future is not female. Yes, women may thrive like we have never before but future is all of us moving forward. The future is all.

And when this is fixed, even if it’s long after my time, I will be successful. That’s what makes me different.